Reading With An E-Reader

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At the end of last year, I published a blog post where I listed all the books I read in 2019. It was a year of not-very-good reading, but for the last months one could definitely see an upswing in my reading habits.

It was because I decided to invest in an e-reader.

I’ve had it for more than a month now, as I purchased it at the end of November, and have had the time to try it out. And the great news is, the e-reader has truly changed my way of reading. I thought it to be interesting to share my insights about the gadget with you, as maybe some of you have wondered about buying one!

So – let’s get into it. I’ll begin with the technical stuff and then we can get into the interesting things: the good aspects and the one fault it has.

My Choice of E-Reader

My e-reader is Kobo Forma that comes with a comfortable 8’’ display and a design that lets you flip through the pages with either using the screen or pushing the two buttons on the side of the display. It’s extremely lightweight and comfortable to hold in hand, and the display is friendly for the eyes even at night time as it does not flicker and has an adjustable color temperature. The battery lasts for a few weeks if I read actively 1-2 hours every day and recharges in just a couple of hours.

The choice was not quickly made. After making the decision to buy an e-reader, I put down a couple of days and several hours to research the different options and what kind of reader would suit me best. Apparently, the best producers of e-readers on the current market are Kobo and Kindle.

The price differences and the technical aspects between Kobo and Kindle are few but there was one thing that made me change my mind from Kindle to Kobo. 

The reason why I wanted to buy an e-reader was to get easier access to books in Finnish and Swedish, something you can barely find in Australia and New Zealand. As I was looking into the e-books that are sold in Finland, I noticed that most of them are in EPUB format. This turned out to be the decisive factor for me and the reason why I chose a Kobo over Kindle. With Kindle, that supports mainly MOBI, you get access to a large variety of English books, while Kobo supports EPUB, and the latter is definitely more popular in Finland and other Nordic countries (and you also get a large variety of books in English).

Kobo Forma is, in my opinion, quite expensive comparing to other models, costing approximately 300 euros. But I decided to give it a go and try one of the best e-readers that are currently on the market to see if I would like it – and there I definitely did the right thing.

The Good About The E-Reader

After purchasing the reader at the end of November, I’ve read five books and are currently more than halfway through two others. For me, the e-reader has been more than anything a game-changer for my reading habits.

I think it is for two reasons. 

First, the e-reader opens up a world of books to me. Previously, I’ve found it challenging to find good or interesting books to read, but somehow, having an e-reader has opened up a world-wide library of books. I now have more than thirty books on my to-be-read list – and I think having an e-reader has something to do with it. E-books tend to be more affordable, they are easy to download and you can have them on your reader in no time. The threshold to buy a book is lower when you get to preview the book prior to purchase, and it feels easier to let a book go when it’s ”only” on your e-reader. 

The second reason is that the e-reader allows me to change the font, the marginals and line spacing on the pages. Suddenly, reading such books as Stephen King’s It or other heavier novels becomes easier and more fun when you’re not forced to read it in small print with too many lines tightly fitted on a page.

In this way, the e-reader makes reading classics and longer novels an easier challenge. And in addition to that, it’s nice to try out reading with different fonts and see what works best for you. The big surprise has been to realize how much I enjoy reading with the OpenDyslexic font that has been designed for people with dyslexia.

It took a while to get used to reading on a display rather than an actual book and my focus tended to shift a bit in the beginning, but in a few days I already found it easier to read for longer times and was able to focus even better after a week of reading.

I was afraid that my eagerness to pick up the e-reader to read would fade within a few weeks after purchasing it. You know, the fun excitement of getting a new gadget tends to wear off after getting used to it – but it didn’t happen with my reader. Sure, some of the early excitement has vanished, but it hasn’t had an effect on my reading hours. Every day, I feel motivated to pick up the reader to continue on the books I’m reading at the moment and on a good day, I get 2-3 hours of reading done.

So – a great purchase, right? But there’s one thing that I consider to be a fault in this whole e-reader thing. It hasn’t got to do with the Kobo Forma itself, but with what it stands for.

The One Big Bad Thing

Books are great. They are awesome. They are entertaining, informative, provoking, even life-changing. The people who write these books are masters of the craft and relentless in their work – they are the people who have gone through the whole writing process, the ups and downs, edits and rejections. I have immense respect for them (especially if I like their books), and because of this I would like to support them.

E-books, however, don’t really support writers.

In a way, they do, but not in the same was as buying an actual copy or borrowing from library does. I checked into the whole deal, how it is in Finland (especially when I wish to read mostly books in Finnish on my e-reader) and found out that writers aren’t compensated for e-books and audiobooks in the same way as they are for physical books.

In Finland, a writer gets royalties for his or her work when signing a book contract and publishing a book (approximately 3 euros per hardcover). They also get approximately 25 cents for every time a book is borrowed from the library (so if four people borrow the book, the writer gets 1 euro).

But for e-books or audiobooks purchased or borrowed, the writers get no additional compensation. So, although I’m supporting Finnish literature by purchasing and reading it, I’m only barely supporting the writers themselves. And that is a major drawback of using an e-reader to read e-books.

Luckily, there are a few things I still can do to support the writers: by buying their book, whether it’s an actual copy or in digital format, I show there’s interest for their work and thus make them a little bit more attractive for publishers. The other thing I can do for them is that I can always review their work and tell about their books to others. Word-of-mouth can be extremely efficient and result in way more than just three euros for purchasing their hardcover in a book shop!

Final Thoughts On Digital Reading

The shift from analog to digital reading has made me a more active reader. It has also encouraged me to pick up more challenging, heavier books and helped me get back to good reading routines. In the long run, all this reading will help me develop as a writer and develop my world view.

I’m happy with my investment and don’t honestly think I could have done any better – in my current situation, an e-reader is the best way for me to keep on reading fiction in many different languages and it helps me get my hands on all kinds of literature wherever I am. Thus far, it has been worth every penny I paid for it and I hope to have many great reading moments with it in the future.

However, it does make me think about the authors and how they aren’t getting compensated for the e-books that are being sold. Luckily, there are ways to support the writers in other ways that, for the time being, help me calm my conscience. In the future, I hope to be able to support the writers in some other ways, but for now, showing interest for their works and putting out a good word for them will have to be enough.

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Have you tried reading with an e-reader? Would you even consider shifting from analog reading to digital?

What My Grandfather Taught Me

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Tomorrow is my grandfather’s funeral. He died peacefully at the respectful age of 95 on a beautiful Friday morning two weeks ago. I visited the care home that morning to see him one last time and I was happy to see the peaceful look on his face – it felt important to see him one last time.

After he passed away, I’ve been going through some old photos I found at my grandparent’s apartment before the place was emptied as they had moved to a care home.

Most of the photos I found have been taken by my grandfather, some of them have been taken by someone else as my grandfather is in the photo. The photos have made me wonder who he was, what he believed in and what of his values has he passed on to me.

He was a silent and a thoughtful man who did smile but not very easily. I remember how he was always reading the newspaper or sleeping. He liked sweets and baked goods. He was always organizing papers and staying updated about what was happening in the country – they subscribed to four different daily newspapers.

Those are some of the memories I have of him. But for the past few weeks I’ve been thinking about his legacy – what he taught me through his way of being and how he lived his life. This is what I’ve realized:

Routines

My grandfather was a man who followed his daily routines. He would wake up at 4 AM to read the newspaper and then take a nap (it was usually my job to go and wake him very carefully and kindly for breakfast). Then he would read or organize his papers, maybe work for a while at his work apartment in the house next door. In the afternoons, he went for his walk. Every single day. Even at old age when Alzheimer was taking over his brain, he could remember all the streets he walked through during that afternoon walk.

I don’t know why he had his routines – I never asked. But he must have known they were good because they give so much more time and space for some proper thinking and for understanding things. Maybe I’ve simply taken after him?

Knowledge

When I was little and did some homework after school at my grandparents, I sometimes needed help finding out about a fact. Most often, I turned to my grandfather who was known for knowing great many details about what seemed to be everything.

However, when I asked my question, may that have been about history or geography or grammar, I never got a straight answer from him although he probably knew it. Instead, he would go to the great bookshelf and pick up one, two or three books about the subject. He then helped me find the right page where I could find the information I was looking for.

I believe he knew that if I would find the information myself I would remember it better – and I believe he was right.

Literature

As you might have realized by now, my grandfather was a man who respected information. He was a history guide and a tour guide on trips in Europe – and together with his team he won several years in a row a competition where the team is supposed to drive from one place to another and answer some detailed questions about the city.

He knew a lot without getting any help from Google, Siri or Sierra.

In addition to love for information, my grandfather respected books. My grandfather was the one responsible for buying us all a book for Christmas. He didn’t mind that they were fiction but I think it meant a lot to him to know that all his grandchildren were fond of reading (I wonder what he would think about Yellow Tails).

Although I wouldn’t maybe hold on to as many books as he did while he lived, I still like to think his love for literature and information has passed on to me.

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In addition to these things, I remember him for his good humor, wisdom and excellent board game skills. One time, me and my grandfather were a team while playing Star of Africa and we won the game by finding the diamond in time and returning home rich as any. He was a clever man.

There’s so many things I would like to ask him now – real grown-up things that I wonder about and would like to hear his thoughts on. I hope he would’ve written a diary of some sort to know what he thought and believed in. But I can’t do that, not ask questions or read his thoughts. It’s too late for that.

But I have his photos, I have my memories – rest of it I’ll just have to build up on my own.