Writerly Update 3: January 2020

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The first month of the first year was the perfect start for my third year of writing.

I can’t really say what it was that made me feel very motivated and inspired, but nevertheless, I managed to write 1,000+ words on eight consecutive days – something that has most likely never happened before (except during NaNoWriMo but my last one was in 2016 and it’s a writing challenge so it doesn’t really count). 

Towards the end of the month, however, as our plans for the next move were starting to take shape, I got distracted from my writing routines and even had to force myself to get at least some writing done.

So, the month started out well but lost some of its charm towards the end of January.

Maybe this January is a good example of how important routines are for a writer, especially when you are in that active writing phase. There’s a place and time for experiencing as well, as I realized when we were in Australia, but when it comes to writing, routines are a writer’s best friend.

In the beginning of the month, I was really into a good rhythm with routines that made me sit me down almost daily to write. Now, as we’ve been preparing both mentally and, in a way, physically for the next step, my routines haven’t had a chance to exist – and that can be seen in my writing.

It really is a roller coaster journey, this life. And it’s full of contradictions too – it’s good to have routines, but it’s also good to be spontaneous. It’s good to plan for your future, but it’s also good not to dwell too much on the past or what’s coming. Somewhere there, in-between routines and spontaneous decisions, one is supposed to find balance. Phew.

Anyway, let’s get to the statistics, shall we?

The Great Statistics

January 2020

Days journaling: 24 days out of 31
Days writing: 20 days out of 31
Word count in total (excluding journaling): 26,980 words

Texts published: 4 blog posts + one fan fiction one-shot
Comments on other people’s texts: 29

Not a bad month, right? I journaled 77,4% of the month and wrote fact and fiction for 64,5% of January. My lowest word count for the day was 1,000 words and highest 2,500. On average, I wrote 1,349 words per writing day (if dividing for the whole month, it equals 870 words per day).

Surprisingly enough, this month was pretty similar to December when it comes to word count (22,480 to 26,980) and average word count per writing day (1,300 to 1,349). I hadn’t really expected that because I thought I had done much better – but I’m still happy I’ve managed to keep up with my journaling and I had more writing days than in December (17 compared to 20 days), so that’s good.

What I Wrote This Month

I spend most of this month writing my long fan fiction story.  Of those twenty writing days in January, 11 was spent on writing that fan fiction story. It felt really good to get the story half-way (although it’s rather murky now).

One of the most rewarding things with it is to realize how much the story is me – I’m using my own characters (and the main character is a minor one in the fandom so I’ve had the chance to re-invent her past and present which makes her feel mine) and I get to invent new knowledge and information about the magical world in almost every chapter. It’s almost like writing something of my own, an original piece.

In addition to the longer fan fiction story, I wrote a short fan fiction one-shot for a Valentine’s Day challenge on the writing forum I’m active on and finished the original short story I started in December. And a week ago, we went to see the movie 1917 (so frigging good!) where I got an idea for another short story. It’s almost done, two-thirds of the way. To balance out all the fiction, I also wrote and published four blog posts on this blog.

Oh, and some days of January were spent writing job applications and updating my CV (which is a total writing mood killer but necessary).

Summing Up January

In my December Update, my goals for January were following:

“I wish to complete the short story I’m working on for the writing competition and let it rest until February (the deadline is in March). I also hope to write at least as much as I did in November, hopefully even more, aiming for 1,000+ words every day that I write. My journaling routine is good at the moment, and I hope to continue like that. In addition to the short story, I aim to keep writing my fan fiction long story, hopefully getting to 20k this month, and if possible, I’d like to get back to writing Yellow Tails again (Remember that? It’s still in the works!).”

Judging from the statistics for this month, I managed to reach almost all my goals for January!

I finished that short story for the competition (and I’m about to open that file for re-reading and editing, yikes!), I wrote 1,000+ words every writing day, kept up with my journaling routines and the longer fan fiction story has now more than 26,000 words in it.

The only thing that didn’t happen was that I let Yellow Tails remain untouched. It was a conscious decision as I realized that balancing between to longer stories would get too messy – I feel it’s better to keep writing one story at a time and focus all energy and attention on that one rather than try dividing your time between two equally interesting projects.

Looking at my January writing accomplishments  is very rewarding and gives me a boost to keep up with the good work in February despite all the things happening in my life at the moment.

As I have no idea what this next month brings with it, I’m a bit hesitant about my writing goals for February. I think I’ll go lightly:

In February, I wish to complete, edit and maybe even send off my two short stories for the writing competition. I also want to keep on journaling on an almost daily basis to keep up with my thoughts and hopefully clear some thinking space for creative writing as well. I aim to publish four blog posts on this blog and keep on writing that longer fan fiction story, maybe coming closer to a total of 40,000 words during February. And hopefully, I’ll be able to write 1,000+ words every writing day.

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How was your writerly January and what are you planning for February? I’d love to hear what other people have been writing and how they feel about the first writing month of the year. Feel encouraged to share in the comments!

Reading With An E-Reader

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At the end of last year, I published a blog post where I listed all the books I read in 2019. It was a year of not-very-good reading, but for the last months one could definitely see an upswing in my reading habits.

It was because I decided to invest in an e-reader.

I’ve had it for more than a month now, as I purchased it at the end of November, and have had the time to try it out. And the great news is, the e-reader has truly changed my way of reading. I thought it to be interesting to share my insights about the gadget with you, as maybe some of you have wondered about buying one!

So – let’s get into it. I’ll begin with the technical stuff and then we can get into the interesting things: the good aspects and the one fault it has.

My Choice of E-Reader

My e-reader is Kobo Forma that comes with a comfortable 8’’ display and a design that lets you flip through the pages with either using the screen or pushing the two buttons on the side of the display. It’s extremely lightweight and comfortable to hold in hand, and the display is friendly for the eyes even at night time as it does not flicker and has an adjustable color temperature. The battery lasts for a few weeks if I read actively 1-2 hours every day and recharges in just a couple of hours.

The choice was not quickly made. After making the decision to buy an e-reader, I put down a couple of days and several hours to research the different options and what kind of reader would suit me best. Apparently, the best producers of e-readers on the current market are Kobo and Kindle.

The price differences and the technical aspects between Kobo and Kindle are few but there was one thing that made me change my mind from Kindle to Kobo. 

The reason why I wanted to buy an e-reader was to get easier access to books in Finnish and Swedish, something you can barely find in Australia and New Zealand. As I was looking into the e-books that are sold in Finland, I noticed that most of them are in EPUB format. This turned out to be the decisive factor for me and the reason why I chose a Kobo over Kindle. With Kindle, that supports mainly MOBI, you get access to a large variety of English books, while Kobo supports EPUB, and the latter is definitely more popular in Finland and other Nordic countries (and you also get a large variety of books in English).

Kobo Forma is, in my opinion, quite expensive comparing to other models, costing approximately 300 euros. But I decided to give it a go and try one of the best e-readers that are currently on the market to see if I would like it – and there I definitely did the right thing.

The Good About The E-Reader

After purchasing the reader at the end of November, I’ve read five books and are currently more than halfway through two others. For me, the e-reader has been more than anything a game-changer for my reading habits.

I think it is for two reasons. 

First, the e-reader opens up a world of books to me. Previously, I’ve found it challenging to find good or interesting books to read, but somehow, having an e-reader has opened up a world-wide library of books. I now have more than thirty books on my to-be-read list – and I think having an e-reader has something to do with it. E-books tend to be more affordable, they are easy to download and you can have them on your reader in no time. The threshold to buy a book is lower when you get to preview the book prior to purchase, and it feels easier to let a book go when it’s ”only” on your e-reader. 

The second reason is that the e-reader allows me to change the font, the marginals and line spacing on the pages. Suddenly, reading such books as Stephen King’s It or other heavier novels becomes easier and more fun when you’re not forced to read it in small print with too many lines tightly fitted on a page.

In this way, the e-reader makes reading classics and longer novels an easier challenge. And in addition to that, it’s nice to try out reading with different fonts and see what works best for you. The big surprise has been to realize how much I enjoy reading with the OpenDyslexic font that has been designed for people with dyslexia.

It took a while to get used to reading on a display rather than an actual book and my focus tended to shift a bit in the beginning, but in a few days I already found it easier to read for longer times and was able to focus even better after a week of reading.

I was afraid that my eagerness to pick up the e-reader to read would fade within a few weeks after purchasing it. You know, the fun excitement of getting a new gadget tends to wear off after getting used to it – but it didn’t happen with my reader. Sure, some of the early excitement has vanished, but it hasn’t had an effect on my reading hours. Every day, I feel motivated to pick up the reader to continue on the books I’m reading at the moment and on a good day, I get 2-3 hours of reading done.

So – a great purchase, right? But there’s one thing that I consider to be a fault in this whole e-reader thing. It hasn’t got to do with the Kobo Forma itself, but with what it stands for.

The One Big Bad Thing

Books are great. They are awesome. They are entertaining, informative, provoking, even life-changing. The people who write these books are masters of the craft and relentless in their work – they are the people who have gone through the whole writing process, the ups and downs, edits and rejections. I have immense respect for them (especially if I like their books), and because of this I would like to support them.

E-books, however, don’t really support writers.

In a way, they do, but not in the same was as buying an actual copy or borrowing from library does. I checked into the whole deal, how it is in Finland (especially when I wish to read mostly books in Finnish on my e-reader) and found out that writers aren’t compensated for e-books and audiobooks in the same way as they are for physical books.

In Finland, a writer gets royalties for his or her work when signing a book contract and publishing a book (approximately 3 euros per hardcover). They also get approximately 25 cents for every time a book is borrowed from the library (so if four people borrow the book, the writer gets 1 euro).

But for e-books or audiobooks purchased or borrowed, the writers get no additional compensation. So, although I’m supporting Finnish literature by purchasing and reading it, I’m only barely supporting the writers themselves. And that is a major drawback of using an e-reader to read e-books.

Luckily, there are a few things I still can do to support the writers: by buying their book, whether it’s an actual copy or in digital format, I show there’s interest for their work and thus make them a little bit more attractive for publishers. The other thing I can do for them is that I can always review their work and tell about their books to others. Word-of-mouth can be extremely efficient and result in way more than just three euros for purchasing their hardcover in a book shop!

Final Thoughts On Digital Reading

The shift from analog to digital reading has made me a more active reader. It has also encouraged me to pick up more challenging, heavier books and helped me get back to good reading routines. In the long run, all this reading will help me develop as a writer and develop my world view.

I’m happy with my investment and don’t honestly think I could have done any better – in my current situation, an e-reader is the best way for me to keep on reading fiction in many different languages and it helps me get my hands on all kinds of literature wherever I am. Thus far, it has been worth every penny I paid for it and I hope to have many great reading moments with it in the future.

However, it does make me think about the authors and how they aren’t getting compensated for the e-books that are being sold. Luckily, there are ways to support the writers in other ways that, for the time being, help me calm my conscience. In the future, I hope to be able to support the writers in some other ways, but for now, showing interest for their works and putting out a good word for them will have to be enough.

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Have you tried reading with an e-reader? Would you even consider shifting from analog reading to digital?

A Writerly Update

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Some ten months ago, I remember writing how sad it was not to be able to be a full-time writer after being one during the summer months. The reason for it was simple: in September, I was forced to start dedicating my afternoons for research on digital volunteerism and crisis communication instead of writing more of Yellow Tails or blog posts.

Of course, I did switch those writing hours in the afternoon for the big thesis project, so it was for ’my own good’ – but still, it didn’t feel right.

Fast-forward to ten months later and this Thursday, I can now declare myself a full-time writer again. Hooray! As the thesis has been accepted and the university has confirmed that I will be graduating, I can dedicate my days to writing again.

And I can assure you that is precisely what I have been doing.

A Writer’s Day

I start my day with clearing my head from the thoughts that swirl around in my mind by writing my journal. In that way, I have a clean slate and can dedicate my energy to my character’s ideas, thoughts and feelings, and write those on the page instead of getting influenced by my own personal thoughts.

After writing my journal entry, I eat breakfast, make some coffee and open my computer. Mondays are usually the day when I write the blog post of the week. On other mornings from Tuesday to Friday or, in best case scenario, Saturday, I focus on one of my creative fiction projects. One of them is my dear Yellow Tails (which I’ve finally started re-writing, super excited to share you some details later!) and the other one is a lengthy fan fiction story I’ve been working on for the past month.

In the afternoon, I try to keep on writing but this time on the one I didn’t work on in the morning. Usually, in the afternoons, it’s the fan fiction project I work on because I tend to choose to give my mornings, i.e. my best writing time, to Yellow Tails.

And, as the evening comes, I tend to dedicate some time to reading other writers’ fan fiction stories and comment on them, giving them some feedback on their writing. This way, I’m taking in some new stories, other styles of writing and at the same time, improving my own writing skills by looking at what makes writing good.

Love for Every Moment

As you can see, most of my daily hours go to writing. I don’t know how many words I manage to write per day, maybe everything between 1,500 and 3,000 which isn’t that much – but still, it keeps me busy all day long.

And I love every single minute of it. I just don’t get tired of it! When I’m not writing the fan fiction project, my mind is going back to the story, wanting to keep on plotting, and when I’m not writing Yellow Tails I’m almost longing to return to my own, self-created characters and wanting to tell their story (again, yes, but only this time better).

My writerly days and the love and the continuing thirst I have for them make me feel two things: one is this weird feeling of knowing that for so many years, I was willing to consider writing as only a hobby or even something I used to do when I was little but not any more.

How wrong was I? Because the other feeling I have is pure happiness and some kind of serenity for the fact that, in a way, I have returned to my childhood dream and my roots by becoming a full-time writer.

And that is something not just any job can give.

14 Hours Of More Clarity

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Thirty days ago, I decided to delete the app for Instagram from my phone and to log out from my Facebook account. For a month now, I haven’t really been up to date with my friends and family or with the newest writing updates or recipe revolutions posted on social media.

And you know what? I’ve been just fine.

The first few days were the oddest. My fingers automatically found their way to the place where the app for Instagram on my phone was. It was also extremely easy to start writing facebook.com on the address bar while surfing the Internet.

But as I was determined about creating a successful change and didn’t experience any abstinence from staying away from the platforms, in a few days, I was completely okay with dedicating my time for something else.

How I Spent My Hours

So, where did my time go? How did I spend those 14–28 hours I counted I would save by quitting scrolling on Instagram and Facebook?

I might have to disappoint you here because I can’t tell you what I did. I honestly don’t know, at least not hour-by-hour. But I can tell you what I think I spent it on:

  • Watching videos on Youtube. And I don’t mean funny animals or home videos –  I’m not an active cat-video person so I didn’t spend hours on watching cute animals fall off shelves or getting their faces caught in Kleenex-boxes. Instead, I spent time watching some interesting, though-provoking videos on self-development and when I was feeling a bit down because of the weather or life in general, I watched videos about van life and sailing (because those videos are most often very sunny and positive).
  • Reading books. I had more brain energy to focus on the content of several different works of fact and fiction. For instance, I finished What I Talk About When I Talk About Running which I reflected on in a blog post. I continued listening to Ayn Rand’s Fountainhead and read the first 600 pages (and continuing) of Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch. I also read and summarized a book about writing called Paper Hearts by Beth Ravis.
  • Thinking. It might sound odd but I actually found more time and especially energy for deeper thinking. As I wasn’t constantly getting distracted by some food photo or book recommendation I had seen or read about on social media, my thoughts were more focused on me and what I am surrounded with. Things I’ve been thinking about have been, for instance, what I want in life, what I think has meaning in my life and how I am as a person.
  • Getting things done. I hope to be able to talk about this more in another post, but as I didn’t have Instagram or Facebook to direct my procrastination needs to, I actually got many such things done that usually would have waited completing for hours: everything from cleaning the coffee maker (and I mean properly) to responding to e-mails directly as they drop into my inbox. Finishing these small things that I tend to leave hanging gave me a sense of achievement (just like making one’s bed in the morning can give).

Doing More By Doing Less

The thing with Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook and Twitter among many other platforms is that they take your time in small, unnoticeable amounts: a few minutes here, ten minutes there. But put together, they result in a specific amount minutes and hours every day. Therefore, I can’t show you exactly how I spent those minutes I’d otherwise have spent on my phone because there wasn’t really anything I did that took only a few minutes from one moment and a few minutes from the other.

In a way, maybe one of the absolute benefits of staying away from active scrolling is this: I was able to put those small snippets of time together and instead, spend an hour or so doing some deeper work. Instead of spending a few minutes of time here and there on some random chores or a few book pages, I put all those snippets together and did something more efficient with those minutes that were turned into a whole hour.

For instance, I spent an hour reading about writing or listening to a book, or took twenty minutes to watch a lengthy video about how to keep an eye on your expenses and create a budget, and so on.

I was able to do more by doing less – if it makes sense?

What About Staying Updated?

But hey – if I’m not that much on the Internet, how do I keep up with the world when I’m not connected to it? How do I know what my friends and family are up to if I can’t check their updates on Facebook or Instagram? And what if I miss out on something important, like an interesting event or a revolutionary food recipe because I’m not on those platforms they are announced or published in?

After being AWOL for a month now, I have to say that I have been completely okay with not being connected or updated. I’ve felt peaceful despite the risk that I might have missed out on something. In a sense, I haven’t experienced any feelings of fear of missing out.

One of the drawbacks of social media is that it creates this need of constantly being present – we need to be there where everyone else is to not miss out on anything. But I have a question: did this same fear exist before we started hanging out on social media? If it did exist, how strong was that fear?

What makes me question this is that although I haven’t watched my sister’s Instagram Stories for a month now or I’m unaware of what my friends have been up to, I haven’t experienced that fear. And why I haven’t is because I know the fear is not real. I know for a fact I’m not worse off because I haven’t been following the news or my friends’ latest adventures. My life hasn’t become worse because of me being offline.

The fear many people experience from not being connected is almost completely made up from thin air. We create that fear ourselves by thinking that we miss out on something if we’re not actively online – although we aren’t.

Or, well, it depends, of course, what you define as something. If you want to be a part of different social media phenomena or want to know what videos have gone viral, then yes, you are missing out if you’re not active on social media. However, if you are afraid of missing out on friends and family updates or the daily news – your fear is probably artificially constructed.

You don’t need social media to know what your friends are doing because you can ask them. And it’s so much more fun to hear from themselves what they’ve been up to instead of not asking because you already know because you saw a short video or a photo of it.

What It Gives and Takes

The decision to ignore the fear of missing out on things and make that fear entirely non-existent comes from finding balance and peace within yourself. You need to be okay with not following the 24/7 news posted on Facebook or find peace with letting those Instagram Stories vanish into thin air without watching them. And the way to find the balance is to ask yourself:

1) What does knowing these things give you? And

2) What does knowing all that information take away from you?

For some people, being on social media actually gives them more than it takes. But for many, constantly updating and being updated is actually taking more time, energy and memory space compared with how much high-quality information one gains in return. If you are able to see the off-balance and acknowledge it, you won’t have a problem finding peace with yourself with not being active on social media.

This is, at least, how I’ve experienced the whole thing.

Final Thoughts

Keeping my mind free from all the information on social media has helped me focus on things. I’ve been putting my concentration to work: my projects are progressing, I’m thinking about more complex issues and have been generating new ideas and thoughts. It’s been relaxing to not stress about Instagram content or being updated with book recommendations, food recipes and writing advice.

Instead, I’ve been able to figure out what I want to know, what I want to read or see and when I want to do it. I’m more in control over my own resources (time, energy, brain power and memory space) when I’m not accidentally giving them to the social media platforms. The hours I have when I’m not scrolling are being invested into my hobbies,  into writing, self-development and spending more time with loved ones.

But what happens after a 30-day detox? What I can tell you is that I’ve made two decisions: 1) I’m not calling it a detox anymore, because 2) I’ll continue being absent from social media for an undetermined period of time.

Maybe there will be a time when I wish to get back in but for now – I’m staying offline.

Investing To Know Yourself

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It was Friday, the sun was setting and we had just finished the typical Ikea-meal: meatballs and mashed potatoes with brown sauce and lingonberry jam. We decided to check the outlet-corner (or the Corner of Findings as it’s called) before hitting the rest of the store, curious to see what they had there.

We have never actually found anything we wanted in the outlet, the furniture being either too expensive or unnecessary for us, but this time my partner spotted a grey armchair on the staff-side of the outlet, kept behind a red-white line that separated the customers from the staff space. We walked to the red-white line to take a closer look at the chair (both curious because we planned on getting armchairs for the new apartment instead of a sofa) when a staff member asked if we wanted to step over the line and try sitting in the chair. Yes, please!

We stepped over the line to the staff-only-space, and I got to test-sit the chair first.

Let me tell you – it was  the  p e r f e c t  chair.

It wasn’t too soft, it wasn’t too hard, it was just perfect (and yes, it was a total Goldilocks moment). And apparently I looked so comfortable sitting in that chair that the staff member reminded me friendly not to fall asleep there. He had a point – the chair felt so comfortable I could have taken a nap in it right then and there.

However, we left Ikea without the perfect armchair. Why? Because 1) the price was not exactly student-friendly, and 2) we aren’t staying in the next apartment too long which made me think it was unnecessary to invest in that kind of armchair for such a short amount of time. It wasn’t an easy decision because I really wanted the chair, but the facts spoke against buying it so we left the grey armchair to the outlet.

Yet, in the evening (after we had returned from the 2,5 hour-long trip to Ikea) my partner asked me this: although the chair was expensive and even though I wouldn’t be able to enjoy it for a very long time – wasn’t I worth that perfect chair? Why wouldn’t I enjoy the perfect chair as long as I could, and invest not in the chair but in myself?

And that was an excellent question. What was I actually doing when I decided not to buy that chair that was so comfortable, so perfect? What kind of logic is it, and is it a sensible logic in the long run?

Cheap Living

I’ve been a student now for five years. I’ve lived on my own, handled my own money and been responsible for many adult-life-things, including my finances. Being a student with a very limited monthly income means that I’ve also lived as cheaply as possible for the past years. It has become a routine of some sort: comparing prices at the food store, making detailed grocery lists, avoiding spontaneous shopping and so on.

Especially after I returned from Ireland in the Fall of 2016, having studied there for one semester as an exchange student, I started paying more attention to my finances. That had most probably to do with the fact that when I came back I had less than 20 euros on my bank accounts (not my most glorious days, to be honest). Before Ireland I hadn’t really considered how I consumed my money – but now I decided to take action, never wanting to be in a similar economic situation again.

Today and two years later, after returning from The Green Island, the situation is quite different. I’ve become more conscious about my incomes and expenses. Together with my partner, we’ve managed to minimize our expenses, and I’m doing my best to update an Excel-file every week to keep an eye on our money.

During these last couple of years, I’ve managed to build an economic buffer for myself for emergency cases, for a rainy day or simply to be able to invest that money someday in something. But as I’ve reached this state of economic ”welfare”, it has made me think: I’ve been saving and saving and saving, 10–15 percent of every payment I’ve received on my bank account from subsidies to study loans to salary. That has been a plan that has worked better than I expected. But when have I saved enough? Or, rather: when can I put my savings into good use? I mean, the money isn’t just supposed to sit there on that bank account until the day I leave this world, right?

Right?

Because, as I wondered about the armchair I had left in Ikea, I asked myself this: how do I know when to skimp and save the money, and when to invest in myself and in my own life? After living the life of a student for so long, do I even know what investing in myself is anymore?

Rerouting the Thinking

As I’ve been living cheaply/economic-consciously for the past couple of years it has become almost like a lifestyle. The economical thinking is rooted into my thought-system and turns on automatically when I’m making choices. In one way, this is extremely helpful, giving me the continuity in cheap living – but when seen from another perspective, it gets a bit tricky.

I feel that this kind of autonomous cheap thinking twists the way I see myself and what I’m worthy of. Often I find myself thinking ”I cannot afford this” and opting for the cheaper alternative instead. Or I leave the object in the store, thinking that ”maybe I don’t need it anyway”. And in one way, again, this is helpful – but then again, I wonder this: do I hinder myself from buying something that could give me great joy simply because I think I can’t afford it?

As the amount of money on my savings account has been increasing slowly but surely, I’ve become more aware of the fact that there are actually quite a lot I could afford. But it’s amazingly difficult to try to switch from that cheap thinking to investment thinking – mostly because when I find something that feels worthy to invest in, those items tend to be the more expensive ones. But if I really want those things and think they will help me do the things I love to do – aren’t they worth the investment?

(By the way – although I’m talking about having money on my savings account and being able to afford things, it doesn’t mean I’m in any way wealthy. I do okay, mostly thanks to government subsidies and a study loan, but I rarely eat out or buy new clothes.)

Investing In Yourself

There is a thing I’ve thought about a good deal after that Friday night in Ikea:

I need to invest in myself to know who I am and what I enjoy.

If that money stays on that savings account from here to eternity, simply growing in amount, why have I been saving it in the first place? Isn’t saving money supposed to be about saving for things you enjoy or want to try out?

If you never invest that money you’ve so patiently been saving, how will you ever learn to know yourself and what kind of things you enjoy? If you only leave cheap, always skimping and thinking ”I can’t afford this” although you do, have you actually lived life to the fullest at all?

During this move we’ve made oh-so-many choices from carpets to chairs to lamps, and it’s been a constant balancing between what to invest in and where to save the money. And the conclusion we have come to in this decision-making process is that if the item you are thinking about helps you get closer to where you want to be or helps you to do what you enjoy, then it’s worth the more expensive one (that also tends to be better quality).

(For instance, the carpet we picked for our livingroom is an investment in our creativity. We call it the jungle mat as it’s a crazy jungle-themed dark-colored carpet with birds and other jungle-like things, and it’s thought-provoking to look at.)

So, after this lengthy thought process on Friday night, we woke up a bit earlier the next morning, drove the car to Ikea five minutes before they opened the doors, raced to the Outlet of Findings, and I bought the chair.

I bought the chair for myself.

I bought the chair because 1) it is comfortable, 2) it doesn’t make my butt hurt, 3) I can see myself drinking my morning coffee in it, reading books and sometimes even writing while sitting in it. In a way, investing in this chair is also an investment in my creative process and my well-being.

And that’s something, isn’t it?

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How much effort do you put into your choice-making when you’re buying something new? What do you think about when making that choice?